We won!!!!! Not really😎

Currently in … Continue Reading

Day 4 (Thursday)

Grey, grey, and as bit more grey as the sun didn’t come up. Light air overnight allowed boats behind to catch up until there hit the wind hole as well – soon though the breeze built back to the 20’s and again we were sailing along at a good pace. As we closed the Tasman coast, boats started appearing  from all directions, converging on the famous "Organ Pipes" cliffs. We gybed several times in really confused seas to line up for the last 40 miles to the finish, way up the Derwent River, in downtown Hobart.
We finished, we cleaned up the boat for docking, and then had the most wonderful surprise. The finishing boats are announced over a PA, music kicks in, and we tour the waterfront on the way to the marina. Hundreds and hundreds of people lining the docks cheered, clapped, and celebrated our finish (as they did for every boat). Our supporters club was in the middle of all this, and they made the loadest noise of course. We eventually docked feeling like World Cup winners, and then were handed a case of beer by the organizers – just a nice way to arrive. Celebrations and stories with family and friends ensued, with some fish and chips thrown in for good measure. 
We did well in the race – 27th in IRC, 18th in ORCi.
Safe, tired, and happy.
Now to sort out the boat for her next adventure.

Lindy Out.
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Sydney to Hobart Update 2

Subject: Race Day 2 (Tuesday) Lots of sail changes through the night as the breeze shifted and lightened. As the sun came up we found Rory and Joe in the engine changing belts for some reason. This delayed the first coffee of the day to the chagrin of the crew. Breeze eased off until midday when it started building again – we’re currently mid-afternoon running along at 11 knots with an A2 spinnaker, staysail, and full main set. Tonight Boeuf Bourgenoin (Australian spelling). We have developed a routine between sail handling, checking weather, and communicating via the single sideband with the race relay vessel “JBW”. Three times a day, we copy the skeds and provide our position. This gives us insight into the progress of the fleet. As we finish this note (just after midnight), we are about halfway across the entrance to Bass Strait. The winds are moderate and seas just a little lumpy. By noon tomorrow expect to be across the Bass Strait and approaching Tasmania – here’s hoping for fair winds. Crew all happy, not ill, and thankful that Joe includes mental health professionals in the team! Luv to all Triple Lindy crew Continue Reading